Advanced Placement Classes

Advanced Placement (AP) is a program created by the College Board, which offers college-level curricula and examinations to high school students. Our school offers a selection of AP courses available for qualifying students to take in various subjects.


English

AP Language and Composition (11th Grade)

Instructed By: P. Lagmay & J. Fischedick

The AP Program offers two courses in English studies, each designed to provide high school students the opportunity to engage with a typical introductory-level college English curriculum.

The AP English Language and Composition course focuses on the development and revision of evidence-based analytic and argumentative writing and the rhetorical analysis of nonfiction texts. The AP English Literature and Composition course focuses on reading, analyzing, and writing about imaginative literature (fiction, poetry, drama) from various periods. There is no prescribed sequence of study, and a school may offer one or both courses.

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AP Literature and Composition (12th Grade)

Instructed By: R. Smith

The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course.The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.

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Mathematics

AP Calculus AB & AP Calculus BC (11th or 12th Grade)

Instructed By: L. Haraj

AP Calculus AB and AP Calculus BC focus on students’ understanding of calculus concepts and provide experience with methods and applications. Although computational competence is an important outcome, the main emphasis is on a multirepresentational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally.The connections among these representations are important.

Teachers and students should regularly use technology to reinforce relationships among functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results.Through the use of the unifying themes of calculus (e.g., derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling) the courses become cohesive rather than a collection of unrelated topics.

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AP Statistics (11th or 12th Grade)

Instructed By: R. Ieraci & J. Yanez

The AP Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics.The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding.

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Social Studies

AP World History (10th Grade)

Instructed By: E. Anderson

AP World History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about world history from approximately 8000 BCE to the present and apply historical thinking skills. Five themes of equal importance — focusing on the environment, cultures, state-building, economic systems, and social structures — provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation across different periods and regions. AP World History encompasses the history of the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, with special focus on historical developments and processes that cross multiple regions.

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AP U.S. History (11th Grade)

Instructed By: A. Heavey

AP United States History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about U.S. history from approximately 1491 to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Seven themes of equal importance — identity; peopling; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; environment and geography; and ideas, beliefs, and culture — provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course.These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places.

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AP Micro Economics (12th Grade)

Instructed By: B.Weckstein

AP United States Government and Politics introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments.

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